Home / 2019 / January (Page 4)

Over a few weeks each January and September, publications are flooded with fashion week coverage that all starts to blend together and, next thing you know, you’ve missed this Swingers-tastic dollar-sign shirt or the football helmet-wearing models Virgil Abloh sent down the runway. But I, someone who has a hard time paying attention to most things, have done you the favor of sifting through the coverage to tease out the things you

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Fashion capitals are no longer exclusive to the West. They are the eastern cities of Tbilisi and Kiev; Singapore, Hong Kong, Tokyo, and Shanghai. Brands move to create shows specifically for Japan and China, presenting their collections directly in Asia’s massive luxury fashion market. But while the market is certainly moving at an astonishing pace, what it means to be a designer of Eastern heritage in an industry that holds

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In recent work, Gil Bruvel carefully arranges pieces of wood, with startling faces emerging. This is just one example of the sculptor’s work, which also spans metalworking, oil painting, and several other mediums. The artist’s larger sculptures, in particular, tend to render the human head in unexpected ways.

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Historia das Americas II Guy Laramée (previously) erects topographic specimen from collections of vintage books. His carved sculptures imitate the mountains of knowledge once physically collected in books rather than compiled via digital means. In this series of new works from 2017-2018 the Montreal-based artist incorporates traditional methods of book organization as integral parts of the sculptures— such as box set containers, simple wood stands, and metal bookends reminiscent of public

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“Triangle of Love” The natural world gets an unusual interpretation through the lens of Northern California-based painter Tiffany Bozic (previously). She combines a highly developed realism with surreal juxtapositions of animals and plants in carefully composed paintings that question the “natural order” of the environment. In Triangle of Love, an owl family cozies up in a bed of gold-hued four leaf clovers, while in Aether, moths and caterpillars are drawn to a marbled pentagon hovering

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Museum of Fine Art and Lace (Musée des Beaux-arts et de la Dentelle) in Alençon, France (2018), all images courtesy of NeSpoon Polish artist NeSpoon (previously) creates spraypainted murals and textile installations based on traditional lace motifs. Her public paintings often stretch the height of multi-story urban structures, while her yarn works cling to passageways and trees like enlarged spiderwebs. Recent public pieces include a mural for the Museum of Fine Art and Lace

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Fred Tomaselli, “Cubic Sky” (1988
), plexiglas, enamel paint, fluorescent lights, wood, hardware
, 123 x 105 x 54 inches, 
dimensions variable (© Fred Tomaselli, all images courtesy the artist and James Cohan, New York, unless otherwise noted) The first thing Fred Tomaselli shows me, as I arrive at his studio, is his 1988 piece “Cubic Sky.” It is an installation of suspended black cubes depicting the constellations. It’s hung over a bed

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Anni Albers, “Pasture” (1958), cotton, 394 x 356mm, lent by the Metropolitan Museum of Art, purchase, Edward C. Moore Jr. Gift, 1969 © 2018 the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/DACS, London) LONDON — Anni Albers, who wrote the important book titled On Weaving, was a master of the form. Her knowledge of it was encyclopedic. In fact, she wrote the entry on weaving for the 1963 edition of the

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TWO CENTURIES AGO, Simcha Bunim, a neighborhood pharmacist turned celebrity rabbi, proposed a simple treatment for the human condition. All of us, he said, should carry a pair of mantras wherever we go, one in each pocket. When life makes us feel small, insignificant, terminally puny, we should pull out the inscription on the right: “The world was created for me.” When we’re puffed up with self-regard, high on our own

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