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The syntagm greatest artist of all times is not attached to Leonardo da Vinci without justification. The reasons for such a claim are multiple; this iconic historical figure firstly set the foundations of modern art-making, and secondly, he embodied the concept of the polymath to the full extent, and therefore the ideal of Renaissance of man. Namely, Leonardo da Vinci is definitely best known for the world’s most iconic masterpieces such as the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper, but he also devotedly explored

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first symptoms, the solo show of amsterdam-based kustaa saksi at the finnish institute in stockholm, presents six unique tapestries that draw from the artist’s scientific examination and personal experience with migraine. manufactured with jacquard weaving technique, the tapestries are woven using cotton warp with mohair, silk, alpaca, cashwool, velvet, rubber, viscose, copper and transparent polyester yarns resulting in richly layered, multi- sensory works. all images courtesy of the artist     kustaa saksi has applied drastic

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“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #5” (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 170 cm, all images courtesy of JD Malat Gallery Conrad Jon Godly (previously) paints in thick, impasto strokes to form snow-capped peaks and mountain ranges in icy black, white, and blue. The textured formations on canvas have feathered edges that mimic the high altitude wind, a technique that makes you almost feel the subject’s arctic blast. The works are

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240-year-old ceramics company Royal Copenhagen “is very much a sort of Danish DNA,” says artist Cathrine Raben Davidsen, who grew up around the brand’s iconic blue and white dishes. It’s not only locals, though, who like the heritage house’s wares. In recent years it has increased its offerings, exploding the signature Flora pattern into a “Mega” range and experimenting with patternless plates in different glazes. Meanwhile, Raben Davidsen, well known

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The second edition Desert X has touched down in the Coachella Valley of California, with site-specific work by 18 artists selected by artistic director Neville Wakefield and co-curators Amanda Hunt and Matthew Schum. The biennial gives new meaning to the word sprawling, with works scattered about an area of around 55 miles, in eight of the nine cities of the Coachella Valley. (Each artist had a $25,000 budget for his or her

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Ask any art connoisseur to name the big hitter Mexican artists, and Damiàn Ortega will likely make the list. But the artist’s bona fide star status was far from inevitable—when he and his contemporaries were starting out, they fought hard against an establishment that was traditional in its thinking. Now, his punchy, DIY practice has come to define the Mexican art landscape. Words by Elizabeth Fullerton Controller of the Universe, 2007. Courtesy of the artist and

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As Mexico City prepares for Zona Maco and a host of smaller satellite fairs, we take an in-depth look at the capital’s vibrant art scene, featuring interviews with some of its leading artists and most exciting new names. First up, Elizabeth Fullerton introduces the evolving, “DIY” attitude and lively creative buzz that she has encountered in recent years. Lucy Dodd, Sweet Water, 2018. David Lewis Gallery at Zona Maco Flying into Mexico City on a clear

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For some, March means spring break; for die-hard aesthetes, it means a slate of can’t-miss industry happenings around the world. New Yorkers and visitors alike have the Armory Show, Asia Week, and AD’s own Design Show to look forward to. Meanwhile, on the other side of the globe, Singapore will throw an annual citywide celebration of design. If you’re traveling to that part of the world, you might want to start in Singapore

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Pat Steir. Priscilla Waterfall, 1991. © Pat Steir In 1933, the first time that the Barnes Foundation asked an artist to paint something to fit specifically into its walls, the artist was Henri Matisse. Matisse, who had to be convinced, rented a warehouse in Nice to work on what became “The Dance,” only to discover, after a first try, that he’d gotten the measurements wrong. (In 1990, the early version of the triptych

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Kerouac Beat PaintingI have a distinct memory of flipping through the pages of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road (1957) when I was around 16 years old. I was on the metro in Paris. I had heard about Kerouac from my sister and from spending too much time at Shakespeare and Company in the Latin quarter near Notre-Dame. As a French-American person, it felt right that I would discover Kerouac in Paris, the

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